Residential Ponds


        Large numbers of “residential” ponds dot the Brandywine landscape. Some are owned by single homeowners, while others serve as “aesthetic/recreational centerpieces” of open space within community developments and are usually jointly owned by homeowners associations (HOA). In such cases, management of the pond may be the responsibility of an environmental committee within the HOA, whose expertise and enthusiasm may be critical to achieving its intended function (Fig. 11).
history_fig11ab.jpg

Fig. 11a-b. (a) Aerial view of a housing development in East Bradford Township, and (b) photo of a residential pond in West Chester Borough. The HOAs that own both ponds very actively pursue good water quality management, despite challenges caused by nutrient loading from the surrounding land (note the sandy beach used for swimming in summer at the left side of the right-hand photo).


       In such cases, management of the pond may be the responsibility of an environmental committee within the HOA, whose expertise and enthusiasm may be critical to achieving its intended function (Fig. 11). very actively pursues good water quality management, despite challenges caused by nutrient loading from the surrounding land.
        The design features of residential ponds may distinguish them from storm water wet detention basins (next Section), for example by their less constrained basin shape and absence of cement inlet and outlet structures, but many HOA ponds are (like wet detention basins) partly intended to control sediment and nutrient runoff from the surrounding properties.